All posts by Emily Coward

How we are using front-end toolkits

Published
16th December 2014
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
How we are using front-end toolkits

Creating a toolkit is our recommended approach for the majority of our front-end work. However the introduction of this process has presented several challenges not only for our front-end team but for our agency as well. This article covers these challenges and how to overcome them.

What is a front-end toolkit?

Published
3rd June 2014
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
What is a front-end toolkit?

A front-end toolkit acts as a reference, not only for developers but for anyone working on the front-end of a website. It is a “living” body of front-end code and documentation for a website which is updated as and when a site develops during its lifetime.

Text Resizing Tips

Published
25th February 2013
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Text Resizing Tips

Tips for making sure users of your website can resize the text without content becoming lost or obscured.

Movement on a website: 5 things to consider

Published
30th November 2011
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Movement on a website: 5 things to consider

Websites are all about getting people to find and interact with content as quickly as possible. But how do you encourage people to engage with certain pieces of content above others? Some websites choose to do this by adding movement to the content.

Keyboard accessibility quick tip

Published
22nd August 2011
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Keyboard accessibility quick tip

A quick accessibility tip to help you make sure your web pages aren't reliant on someone using just a mouse and can be operated by someone using a keyboard instead.

Accessible Tabs - Part 2: The Solution

Published
4th April 2011
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Accessible Tabs - Part 2: The Solution

As we saw in Accessible Tabs Part 1 - The Problem, there are several accessibility issues with tabs created for the web compared to those created for use in software applications. Tabs on the web should ideally replicate the functionality used in applications, so they are more intuitive for everyone. In this article we will look at three existing scripts for creating accessible tabs.

Accessible Tabs - Part 1: The Problem

Published
7th March 2011
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Accessible Tabs - Part 1: The Problem

Tabs are a well recognised feature of many of today’s websites. Websites such as the BBC, Yahoo and the National Autistic Society all use tabs to utilise the space on their pages by showing more content in a smaller area. The use of tabs on the web is still a relatively new feature which has only really become popular in the last few years. This surge in popularity is mainly due to the introduction of JavaScript libraries such as jQuery which make it extremely easy to add tabs to a website.