All posts for "psychology" tag

The active role of participants and facilitators

Published
1st December 2014
by 
Vicky Brown
Category:
The active role of participants and facilitators

The roles and experiences of both the user and facilitator within the usability testing process need to be considered as an active, contributory factor in the outcomes of traditional usability testing. When a user comes into our test lab to volunteer for a usability testing session, we need to acknowledge that they are a not simply a unanimous voice of our audience but a person entering a novel environment, with all of the concerns and behaviours that entails.

A few thoughts on psychology & UX

Published
2nd April 2014
by 
Vicky Brown
Category:
A few thoughts on psychology & UX

‘So how does a psychology graduate end up in web design?’ - a question I've been asked many times since landing a job at Nomensa. I want to explain how intrinsically linked psychology and UX design are.

Lorem ipsum and the art of prototype testing

Published
30th January 2014
by 
Dave Ellender
Category:
Lorem ipsum and the art of prototype testing

Printers and typesetters have used lorem ipsum for over 500 years to demonstrate visual design elements. Meaningless chunks of Latin makes sure everyone involved in the visual design process focuses solely on font, typography and layout - rather than the words. But this tradition is under attack in the digital sector: in particular, the rise of agile methods and content strategy are conspiring against it.

Start with meaning

Published
16th January 2013
by 
Simon Norris
Category:
Start with meaning

A summary of the key concepts and ideas from the 5 articles in the meaning series. We human beings are hungry for meaning in all aspects of our lives. The meaning-first manifesto is a philosophy for researching and designing meaningful interaction.

Forms part one - the reservoir of goodwill

Published
22nd May 2012
by 
Michael Harris
Category:
Forms part one - the reservoir of goodwill

It seems the only people who enjoy forms in any way are those who get to criticise them for a living.

You may also think there to be masochistic form creators out there who enjoy deliberately creating frustrating experiences; but I believe they are simply failing to grasp how many problems a set of questions and answer fields can run into.

Researching meaning: making sense of behaviour

Published
27th April 2012
by 
Simon Norris
Category:
Researching meaning: making sense of behaviour

Most of our decisions on a daily basis will be driven by some sort of emotional factor rather than thinking or reason. We process more than 11 million pieces of sensory information every second. We can only attend to about 40 of those but the rest is not disregarded - it's processed. As interaction designers we need to learn to dive below the surface and uncover the factors that will help us design deeper meaning.

Why thanking donors online is powerful

Published
1st February 2012
by 
Simon Norris and Juliet Richardson
Category:
Why thanking donors online is powerful

Why should you thank your online donors? After all once they’ve completed the transaction, surely it doesn’t matter what you do then? Having viewed the Thank you pages on a number of different charity websites, it seems as though many charities are taking this attitude.