All posts for "CSS" tag

Cutting the Mustard

Published
21st July 2015
by 
Matt Lawson
Category:
Cutting the Mustard

Should we ignore the 0.3% of site visitors that use Internet Explorer 6? Or should we provide a fairly basic, yet functional experience? Matt Lawson explains how at Nomensa, we can create functional sites for all, no matter which OS, browser or device.

Technical delivery document

Published
20th August 2014
by 
Matt Lawson
Category:
Technical delivery document

A Technical Delivery Document is designed to aid the client's understanding of the way we work and what the outcome is on the end user. We feel it is beneficial to try and communicate our approach at the start of a project and better manage the client's expectations at the same time.

What is a front-end toolkit?

Published
3rd June 2014
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
What is a front-end toolkit?

A front-end toolkit acts as a reference, not only for developers but for anyone working on the front-end of a website. It is a “living” body of front-end code and documentation for a website which is updated as and when a site develops during its lifetime.

Automating front-end build processes using Grunt

Published
27th January 2014
by 
Matt Jennings
Category:
Automating front-end build processes using Grunt

As front end development has become more and more complex over the last few years, developers have started to use a range of different tools for different purposes. Perhaps you are working on a simple project with an AngularJS front end.

Text Resizing Tips

Published
25th February 2013
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Text Resizing Tips

Tips for making sure users of your website can resize the text without content becoming lost or obscured.

CSS Inline styles and why they are considered harmful for accessibility

Published
23rd August 2011
by 
Nomensa
Category:
CSS Inline styles and why they are considered harmful for accessibility

Since the mid 1990s web developers have had an ever increasing amount of control over the presentation of the web pages that they develop. This is largely due to the introduction of CSS (cascading style sheets) and its adoption amongst major browser vendors, both past and present. Although the adoption of the CSS specification has not been without issues it has made it possible for web developers to build visually imaginative and engaging web pages and user interfaces.

Hiding content

Published
29th July 2011
by 
Liam Tullberg
Category:
Hiding content

In this post I will identify some of the common techniques that are used to hide content and will attempt to identify the implications of using these techniques. I will also attempt to identify appropriate situations in which each technique could practically be put to good use. All of the techniques that we have identified below have been tested with Jaws 12 and NVDA 2011.1 using Firefox 4, Firefox 5 and Internet Explorer 8. In addition the examples were tested with voiceover on Apple OSX 10.6.4 with Safari.