All posts for "WCAG" tag

How to write an accessibility statement

Published
17th February 2009
by 
Léonie Watson
Category:
How to write an accessibility statement

An Accessibility Statement is a declaration that defines the level of web accessibility that a website aims to achieve. In this article, we look at why an accessibility statement should be provided and the information that should go into it.

Using CSS focus pseudo class

Published
5th January 2009
by 
Matt Lawson
Category:
Using CSS focus pseudo class

Focus is one of the lesser used Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) pseudo-classes. People familiar with CSS should be aware of the more commonly used pair, link and visited, but will often find that the focus and active pseudo-classes have been missed out. This article aims to explain why they are important and how they can be used to enhance your site.

Practical plans for accessible architectures

Published
6th August 2007
by 
Nomensa
Category:
Practical plans for accessible architectures

The United Nations recently commissioned the world’s first global audit on web accessibility. The study evaluated 100 websites from 20 different countries across five sectors of industry (media, finance, travel, politics, and retail). Only three sites passed basic accessibility checkpoints outlined in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 1.0), and not a single site passed all checkpoints.

Designing for the web

Published
3rd April 2007
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Designing for the web

One of the main tasks web developers face on a regular basis is the challenge of turning a design storyboard into accessible HTML/CSS templates for a website. This task is made more difficult when the web designer has not thought about accessibility. Trying to create accessible templates from a poorly thought out storyboard can be a frustrating experience. It is one that can be easily avoided if the web designer has thought about the medium they are designing for, the web.

Accessibility Lifecycle

Published
13th October 2005
by 
Alastair Campbell
Category:
Accessibility Lifecycle

This article outlines which aspects of accessibility can be checked at each stage of development, with a focus on where automated tools should fit in. Some knowledge of web accessibility is assumed. If this subject is new to you, please read an introductory article on web accessibility. The target audience is people who manage medium to large web site projects.