All posts for "web design" tag

“Do we need to push?”: A proposed framework for persuasion in ecommerce design

Published
3rd December 2010
by 
Jon Fisher
Category:
“Do we need to push?”: A proposed framework for persuasion in ecommerce design

To many online retailers, the holy grail of behavioural change would be engaging more customers in deciding to purchase! In a UCD ecommerce process what persuasive elements do we include and at what time? How do we “persuade and not force”? Exactly how hard do we push potential customers? This article proposes a potential framework for designing persuasive techniques into the design of an ecommerce website in order to maximise revenue and create great user experiences!

The Science of Persuasion in Web Design

Published
1st February 2010
by 
Jon Fisher
Category:
The Science of Persuasion in Web Design

Whether negotiating million pound business deals or convincing a toddler that playing with the sharp knife is a bad idea, we have all tried to convince someone else that our opinion is worth considering. Persuasion is an innate human skill that we regularly use, sometimes without even knowing. Captology (Computers As Persuasive Technologies) is a new discipline that has increased in prominence as we continue to replace human roles with computers. In a busy market place perhaps captology can give you the edge you need?

The Design Patterns of Social Media

Published
2nd November 2009
by 
Nomensa
Category:
The Design Patterns of Social Media

Most websites nowadays incorporate some kind of community aspect which allows users to provide feedback to the site's owners and to each other. In fact, 'building community' is one of the most important aspects of any modern website. Websites that focus on their community or group nature are described as being social sites, an umbrella term that can cover a great number of disparate services. This article will describe how Developers can utilise social design patterns on a site in order to promote or dull certain behaviours in an online community.

Using CSS focus pseudo class

Published
5th January 2009
by 
Matt Lawson
Category:
Using CSS focus pseudo class

Focus is one of the lesser used Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) pseudo-classes. People familiar with CSS should be aware of the more commonly used pair, link and visited, but will often find that the focus and active pseudo-classes have been missed out. This article aims to explain why they are important and how they can be used to enhance your site.

Layout flexibility: To switch or not to switch

Published
24th November 2008
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Layout flexibility: To switch or not to switch

Creating an accessible and flexible layout for a website can be a difficult task. More often than not web developers encounter problems with the flexibility of the design they are trying to produce as HTML/CSStemplates . Designs should be flexible enough to work at a variety of resolutions. However some designs produced at a width of 1024px just don’t translate well to a width of 800px. The limited amount of space available at 800px often means the content on the page is too close together or text overlaps ridiculously when the font size of the page is increased. This means that the display of content on the page can be difficult to comprehend when the browser window is narrow, but looks great when the window is a lot wider.

Tables, more than just rows and cells

Published
1st May 2008
by 
Matt Lawson
Category:
Tables, more than just rows and cells

Structuring tables correctly is an important step in developing an accessible website but sadly it is rarely achieved. Many website developers do not realise the importance of creating accessible tables in their designs and, time after time, I find myself auditing pages with tables that fail due to lack of basic table structure.

With this in mind, I am hoping to pass on some quick, simple tips for creating tables. This is by no means an extensive list of table attributes, but those which are required to make a simple table accessible for all users.

Designing for the web

Published
3rd April 2007
by 
Emily Coward
Category:
Designing for the web

One of the main tasks web developers face on a regular basis is the challenge of turning a design storyboard into accessible HTML/CSS templates for a website. This task is made more difficult when the web designer has not thought about accessibility. Trying to create accessible templates from a poorly thought out storyboard can be a frustrating experience. It is one that can be easily avoided if the web designer has thought about the medium they are designing for, the web.